Separation at the end, Matthew 13:47-50

You have surely noticed that, whether in good situations or bad, mostly our lives just rock along in a routine set of events. We take that as the way of the world and expect it, but one day all of this will suddenly stop. Then what?

Matthew 13:47-50

47 Once again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net that was let down into the lake and caught all kinds of fish. 48 When it was full, the fishermen pulled it up on the shore. Then they sat down and collected the good fish in baskets, but threw the bad away. 49 This is how it will be at the end of the age. The angels will come and separate the wicked from the righteous 50 and throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Commentary

With the words once again (verse 47), Jesus launches another parable using a common element of life in Galilee, the dragnet. A dragnet could be hundreds of feet long and perhaps 6 feet wide. The top of the net was kept on the surface by floats, and the bottom forced to hang down by the use of weights. Teams of people could stretch such a net out into shallow water and gradually drag it ashore, or the net could be deployed between two boats. Either way, the dragnet scooped up whatever fish were in its path.

Jesus said that the dragnet caught all kinds of fish (verse 47), and Keener suggests that the Sea of Galilee had about 24 kinds of fish.[1] Not all were edible, and not all met the kosher requirements set down in the law. So, the fishermen dragged the net ashore and started separating the acceptable from the unacceptable.

The Parable of the Dragnet is one of the few parables that Jesus explains. He spends no time whatever on the dragnet process but focuses only on (1) the separation of the wicked from among the righteous, and (2) the terrible circumstances of the wicked after the separation.

Of all the English versions, only KJV (sever the wicked from among the just) and NASB (take out the wicked from among the righteous) rightly preserve the italicized word, translated from the Greek original. It may be that this detail is not significant, but possibly the wicked are trying to hide among the righteous. After all, who is going to step forward voluntarily to be thrown into a blazing furnace?

The parable seems to serve as Jesus confirmation that his present kingdom would indeed lead to a time when evil is obliterated.[2]

Have you ever wondered why God doesn’t eliminate evil people? How does this parable address that question?

Copyright 2017 Barry Applewhite, Plano, Texas. All rights reserved worldwide. Materials originally prepared for Christ Fellowship, McKinney, Texas. Used by permission.

[1] Craig S. Keener, A Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1999), 392.

[2] Klyne Snodgrass, Stories with Intent (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2008), 491.

Do you have an opinion or a different interpretation? Let me know!